• Twin Waves MKII




    Twin Waves MK II

    Dual VCO/LFO/random

    Our bestseller gets an upgrade - more control for more fun!
    Algorithm-based wave engines with Sync, FM, through-zero, VCA, ring-mod, bit-crushing, filtered noise, brownian vectors, quantizer, clock sync with adjustable ratio, ... all instantly configured for optimal results without hassle.

  • Klavis - Quadigy




    Quadigy

    Quad programmable
    Envelope Generator

    • Four 7-stage envelopes
    • Continuous curve shaping
    • Cycle mode with 5 clocks, fit to clock,
      mult/div, offset & gating
    • 156-points modulation matrix
    • 32 presets with morphing

  • Klavis - CalTrans




    CalTrans

    Quad V/Oct Calibrator & Transposer

    • V/Oct curve creation, correction and range expansion
    • Single or multiple channel selection for live control
    • Separate octave and semitone rotary encoders
    • Inputs chaining for chords creation
    • Per channel live settings:
      • Octave & semitones transpose
      • Semitone quantizer on/off
      • Portamento duration
      • Glissando duration

  • Klavis - Flexshaper




    Flexshaper

    CV-controlled voltage mapper & waveshaper

    • Process from DC to full audio range
    • Unipolar/bipolar input mode switch
    • Five manual voltage mapping potentiometers
    • Five CV control of the voltage mapping points
    • Simultaneously active unipolar and bipolar outputs

  • Klavis - Mixwitch




    Mixwitch

    Voltage & clock controlled
    mixer-switcher

    • Two 2>1 or one 4>1 mixer
    • Polarity, lin/log, mute and gain control
    • Optional selector acting on 2 or 4 inputs:
      • CV control for arbitrary input selection
      • Clock control for sequential or random input selection

  • Klavis - Logica XT




    Logica XT

    Advanced CV & clock controlled
    multiple-input logic & gate processor

    • Three inputs plus manual button
    • Simultaneously normal, inverted and divide by two outputs
    • Fourteen modes of operation
    • User-defined durations and default modes auto-stored in memory
    • 5000+ steps delay line
    • Gater function to add-up multiple gate signals while maintaining each triggering

  • Klavis - Two Bits










    Two Bits

    Dual logic processor with chaining and CV

    • 15 different logic functions
    • Several unique functions
    • Chaining for 4/5 input functions
    • CV functions:
      • Random pass gate
      • Gated voltage comparator
      • Clock multiplier/divider
      • 10 sec delay line

The disaster of Eurorack supply

Short history

At the birth of Eurorack as a generic name for a format of modular synthesizers, there was a then small German company called Doepfer.
Its founder, Dieter Doepfer found convenient to reuse parts of the official Eurorack specification as the mechanical basis for modular synthesizers more compact than the then prevalent Moog format.

Industrial (official) Eurorack is a well-documented specification that encompasses mechanical and electrical aspects of systems used in industries, trains, power plants, hospitals and other high reliability purposes, and is thus more on the costly side of things.

In his attempt at reducing the cost on the electrical side, Doepfer went for a cheap bus-board fitted with headers instead of proper shrouded/boxed connectors with guaranteed orientation


Is there a problem?

Unfortunately, there are several problems with the legacy of Doepfer’s specified Eurorack supply bus.

1. Reversibility

Contrarily to some connectors such as USB-C that can be plugged both ways, the Eurorack connector must be inserted in the proper orientation. If not, supply problems will occur.
This issue must be solved by the module designer by implementing some protection circuitry so that plugging a supply cable the wrong way does not kill the module.
Hopefully, solutions are affordable and easy to implement.

Given the difference in cost for headers versus shrouded connectors, it is a shame to still design and sell bus-boards and modules with unshrouded connectors.

The standard for IDC shrouded connectors dates back to the nineteen-sixties. There is zero excuse for not following it. It specifies the pin numbering and the place of the cable marking on the pin 1 side and the connector shape prevents reverse insertion.

2. “The” supply shorting issue

Here is the main reason behind this whole article.

When defining the supply connector pin allocation, one horrible mistake was done leading to serious consequences.

Adding the wrong way a module to a rack can fry other modules that make use of the 5V rail !

How is that possible? How could a mistake done with one module kill some other(s)?

As could be seen in the following drawing, the ground pins of the inverted module become independent from the ground; instead, since they are all joined on the inverted module, they short the 12V and 5V rails (and CV). The 12V supply is sent where there should be only 5V.
Depending on the type and strength of the supply, the resulting voltage on the 5V rail goes somewhere between 7V and 12V, guaranteeing a sure fry of all modules expecting the 5V rail to not be beyond 5V.

Note that a lack of proper protection, can also impact the reversed module! This depends on the module design and if it was actually mounted in the case or left "floating" outside, therefore creating or not an independent path to ground.

Killing the 5V regulator !

Bringing 12V on the 5V rail can kill the passive 5V regulators usually mounted on the busboard.
These chips don't stand the excess backward current or a voltage higher than their normal output voltage.

 


As a user, what should I take care of?

Be extra cautious with the connector orientation when adding modules with a 16-pin connector.

Some older Doepfer modules are documented as presenting a reversed connector. With a bus-board offering shrouded connectors, you will need a custom inverting cable, in other words, a cable deliberately manufactured the wrong way!

Note that several would-be Eurorack designers provide various wrongly assembled cables:

  • Electrically OK cables but with the cable red marking on the wrong side
  • Cables with a connector inverted at one end, implicitly with a wrong red marking at some end !

I case of uncertainty, here is a strategy to minimize the risk:

  • Don't add a new 16-pin module if there are already 16-pin modules in the rack.
  • First, disconnected the supply cables from all your 16 pin modules. Take notes/pictures if some later reinsertion will not be obvious!
  • Then connect your newly acquired module alone (alone among the 16-pin ones).
  • Only if the new module behaves nicely alone can you reconnect the other ones whose orientation was known and validated.

With this approach, if inserted the wrong way, the new module cannot fry any other.

If you are serious about protecting your investment, buying a dedicated Eurorack cable tester is a good idea. Especially if you are fond of DIY and other hobbyist and handcrafted modules.

 


As a module designer what should I do?

Never use the 5V rail as a 5V-guaranteed supply.
If the user inverts another module, you'll get more than the expected 5V!

On the other hand, using the 5V rail with a regulator that makes a lower voltage (e.g. 3.3V) from the 5V is fine as long as your regulation circuit (regulator and capacitors) can accept 12V and stand the heat increase resulting from a higher than expected voltage drop.

Possibly do not use pins 7 and 8 in your designs when designing with a 16-pin connector. You still have 4 pins of ground instead of 6, which is plenty.

  • This will avoid shorting the 5V and 12V rails in case of connector inversion by the user, thus protecting the user's other modules.
  • There still will be a possible short between the 5V and the CV rails which hopefully is unlikely to kill anything.

 


Could have it be done differently?

If Dieter Doepfer took a few minutes thinking about his supply implementation choices, hundreds of modules premature dead could have been avoided. Many users and manufacturers learned it the hard way.

Various options for a better pin mapping were available. Unfortunately, Doepfer went for the most disastrous choice.

Having the only two positive supply rails being shorted (in case of inversion) means that the usual protecting diodes are helpless.

If only the 5V was put at the end of the connector (pins 15 and 16), everything would be fine. There would be no overvoltage short and the inversion of polarity would be stopped by simple protecting diodes.

It could have been done even better by making the whole connector reversible (à la USB3) where the pin allocation is reversed on the two connector rows. At least, such implementation could have been an excuse for using simple headers without orientation protection.

 

Continue reading

The disaster of Eurorack supply

Short history

At the birth of Eurorack as a generic name for a format of modular synthesizers, there was a then small German company called Doepfer.
Its founder, Dieter Doepfer found convenient to reuse parts of the official Eurorack specification as the mechanical basis for modular synthesizers more compact than the then prevalent Moog format.

Industrial (official) Eurorack is a well-documented specification that encompasses mechanical and electrical aspects of systems used in industries, trains, power plants, hospitals and other high reliability purposes, and is thus more on the costly side of things.

In his attempt at reducing the cost on the electrical side, Doepfer went for a cheap bus-board fitted with headers instead of proper shrouded/boxed connectors with guaranteed orientation


Is there a problem?

Unfortunately, there are several problems with the legacy of Doepfer’s specified Eurorack supply bus.

1. Reversibility

Contrarily to some connectors such as USB-C that can be plugged both ways, the Eurorack connector must be inserted in the proper orientation. If not, supply problems will occur.
This issue must be solved by the module designer by implementing some protection circuitry so that plugging a supply cable the wrong way does not kill the module.
Hopefully, solutions are affordable and easy to implement.

Given the difference in cost for headers versus shrouded connectors, it is a shame to still design and sell bus-boards and modules with unshrouded connectors.

The standard for IDC shrouded connectors dates back to the nineteen-sixties. There is zero excuse for not following it. It specifies the pin numbering and the place of the cable marking on the pin 1 side and the connector shape prevents reverse insertion.

2. “The” supply shorting issue

Here is the main reason behind this whole article.

When defining the supply connector pin allocation, one horrible mistake was done leading to serious consequences.

Adding the wrong way a module to a rack can fry other modules that make use of the 5V rail !

How is that possible? How could a mistake done with one module kill some other(s)?

As could be seen in the following drawing, the ground pins of the inverted module become independent from the ground; instead, since they are all joined on the inverted module, they short the 12V and 5V rails (and CV). The 12V supply is sent where there should be only 5V.
Depending on the type and strength of the supply, the resulting voltage on the 5V rail goes somewhere between 7V and 12V, guaranteeing a sure fry of all modules expecting the 5V rail to not be beyond 5V.

Note that a lack of proper protection, can also impact the reversed module! This depends on the module design and if it was actually mounted in the case or left "floating" outside, therefore creating or not an independent path to ground.

Killing the 5V regulator !

Bringing 12V on the 5V rail can kill the passive 5V regulators usually mounted on the busboard.
These chips don't stand the excess backward current or a voltage higher than their normal output voltage.

 


As a user, what should I take care of?

Be extra cautious with the connector orientation when adding modules with a 16-pin connector.

Some older Doepfer modules are documented as presenting a reversed connector. With a bus-board offering shrouded connectors, you will need a custom inverting cable, in other words, a cable deliberately manufactured the wrong way!

Note that several would-be Eurorack designers provide various wrongly assembled cables:

  • Electrically OK cables but with the cable red marking on the wrong side
  • Cables with a connector inverted at one end, implicitly with a wrong red marking at some end !

I case of uncertainty, here is a strategy to minimize the risk:

  • Don't add a new 16-pin module if there are already 16-pin modules in the rack.
  • First, disconnected the supply cables from all your 16 pin modules. Take notes/pictures if some later reinsertion will not be obvious!
  • Then connect your newly acquired module alone (alone among the 16-pin ones).
  • Only if the new module behaves nicely alone can you reconnect the other ones whose orientation was known and validated.

With this approach, if inserted the wrong way, the new module cannot fry any other.

If you are serious about protecting your investment, buying a dedicated Eurorack cable tester is a good idea. Especially if you are fond of DIY and other hobbyist and handcrafted modules.

 


As a module designer what should I do?

Never use the 5V rail as a 5V-guaranteed supply.
If the user inverts another module, you'll get more than the expected 5V!

On the other hand, using the 5V rail with a regulator that makes a lower voltage (e.g. 3.3V) from the 5V is fine as long as your regulation circuit (regulator and capacitors) can accept 12V and stand the heat increase resulting from a higher than expected voltage drop.

Possibly do not use pins 7 and 8 in your designs when designing with a 16-pin connector. You still have 4 pins of ground instead of 6, which is plenty.

  • This will avoid shorting the 5V and 12V rails in case of connector inversion by the user, thus protecting the user's other modules.
  • There still will be a possible short between the 5V and the CV rails which hopefully is unlikely to kill anything.

 


Could have it be done differently?

If Dieter Doepfer took a few minutes thinking about his supply implementation choices, hundreds of modules premature dead could have been avoided. Many users and manufacturers learned it the hard way.

Various options for a better pin mapping were available. Unfortunately, Doepfer went for the most disastrous choice.

Having the only two positive supply rails being shorted (in case of inversion) means that the usual protecting diodes are helpless.

If only the 5V was put at the end of the connector (pins 15 and 16), everything would be fine. There would be no overvoltage short and the inversion of polarity would be stopped by simple protecting diodes.

It could have been done even better by making the whole connector reversible (à la USB3) where the pin allocation is reversed on the two connector rows. At least, such implementation could have been an excuse for using simple headers without orientation protection.

 

Where to buy

Select a retailer according to your location and language preference.
Hovering the buttons provides you details about the location.

European Union

Elevator Sound

English

Escape from Noise

Svenska

English

Hieber Lindberg

Deutsch

Hit Space

Magyar

Martin Pas

English

Midi Amsterdam

Nederlands

English

Modular Square

Français

English

Modular Synthesizers

Nederlands

English

Music City

Français

Music Store

Multilingual

Raw Voltage

Deutsch

English

Schneidersladen

Deutsch

English

Sound of You

Polski

English

Synthesizer GR

ελληνικά

English

Thomann

Multilingual

United Kingdom

Elevator Sound

English

Juno Records

English

London Modular

English

Matttech Modular

English

Post Modular

English

Signal Sounds

English

Thonk

English

Switzerland

House of Sound

Multilingual

United States

Control

English

Detroit Modular

English

Midwest Modular

English

Perfect Circuit

English

Three Wave Music

English

Amazon USA

English

Español

Canada

Nightlife Electronics

English

Technosynth

Français
English

Asia

Clock Face Modular

日本語
English

Australia

Found Sound

English

Sales through Amazon USA

Terms and conditions of sales are those offered by Amazon depending on your country.
There are no direct sales from this website.

Cost-free shipping

Amazon deliveries in USA are cost-free; other regions benefit from reduced shipping costs.

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DISCONTINUED! See Logica XT

or Two Bits

Logica Gater

Voltage-controlled logic and gate processor
  • 9 modes of operation: 7 logic functions + forcing to 1 or 0
  • Unique Gater function to add-up multiple gate signals while maintaining each triggering
  • 3 normalized input jacks + manual button for quad signal handling
  • Simultaneously normal and inverted outputs (e.g. And & Nand)
  • Dedicated Flip-Flop output (divider by two)
  • Continuous manual + Bipolar CV control of the 9 logic options
  • LEDs on all outputs
  • LED on manual button indicating its default status
  • Skiff-friendly & compact module

Logic functions are a longtime ally in the modular toolbox.
In the typical Klavis’ approach, we had to bring something extra to the party.
First, we made the selection of the logic function controllable by a voltage; this way creative dynamics can be put in place.
Secondly, we have our unique Gater function which combines gates in a way no traditional logic function does: it creates as many individual gate triggers on the output jack as are arriving on the various inputs.

User Manual V1.0

Quick guide V1.0

119€ / USD139

Mechanical

Dimensions mm inches Eurorack
Height 128.40 5.06 3HE
Width 25.00 0.98 5HP
Depth behind panel
(with supply cable inserted)
25.00 0.98

Supply

Supply rail Current draw
+12V 0mA
-12V 1mA
+5V 16mA

The Klavis Logica is probably the best logic module out there

Review

Sound on Sound - August 2017

Videos

Continue reading

Discontinued - See Twin Waves MK II

Twin waves

Voltage-controlled Dual VCO/LFO
  • Two oscillators independently set as VCO or LFO
  • Features in VCO mode:
    • V/Oct tracking over 10 octaves
    • Through zero and linear FM
    • Sub-octave output
    • Hard & soft synchronization
    • VCA control and CV algorithms selection
    • Quantizer with various scales
    • 20 algorithm-based synthesis types among:
      • Wave shaping
      • Phase modulation
      • Phase positioning of multiple waves
      • Up to 5 stacked oscillators in tunable unison
      • Self-sync with phantom oscillator
      • Additive synthesis (7 waves)
      • Variable bit reduction (bit-crushing)
      • Ring modulator with its own 2nd oscillator
      • Noise with LPF, BPF, or resonant filter
  • Features in LFO mode:
    • Simultaneous signal and trigger outputs
    • External wave synchronization
    • Clock controlled rate with voltage controlled multiplier and divider
    • CV and knob control of output level
    • Algorithm based wave engine with a selection of:
      • Wave shaping
      • Phase modulation
      • Random levels and vectors (also Brownian)
      • Randomly spaced triggers and waves
  • Display with contextual icons and instant reminder help text
  • LEDs indicating potentiometer vs. value matching, switch settings and output levels
  • Automatically saved settings for instant recall at power on
  • Firmware update by playing an audio file via the front panel
  • Compact and skiff-friendly module

The driving idea behind the Twin waves voltage-controlled dual oscillator/LFO is to offer two interesting oscillators in a skiff-friendly and compact size. To achieve that challenge, we built the product’s architecture on the concept of pre-defined algorithms, where the most useful configurations and their matching parameter are ready to use.


Check the review in Sound on Sound magazine
There were several firmware/features updates since that review!


The Twin waves was mentioned in the following query-posts on Muffwiggler:
  • Standout modules of the last couple of years?
  • What is the most FUN module you own?
  • What are you using for LFOs?
  • Most unique digital VCO you've heard?
  • What's your favorite non-drum percussion module?
  • Must have VCO max 12HP
  • Must have VCO max 10HP


User manual V1.7

Quick guide V2.0

Firmware 1.35

229€ / USD249

Mechanical

Dimensions mm inches Eurorack
Height 128.40 5.06 3HE
Width 40.00 1.57 8HP
Depth behind panel
(with supply cable inserted)
37.40 1.47

Supply

Supply rail Current draw
+12V 46mA
-12V 18mA
+5V 0mA

I'm not sure what development in the module contributes to this aspect, but it produces some of the fullest/fattest sounds I've heard from a digital oscillator, not to mention it's packed with features and very well thought out.

The FM between oscillators sounds different than everything else in my rig....sputtery and juicy when both are in audio range, and spazzy when LFO FM's audio rate.
Makes a chap wanna get a second one.

Best digital oscillator(s) I’ve ever used.

I love my Twin Waves!
From the first moment, it has become the definite go-to VCO in my rack, and if I feel the need to double up one particular vco module, it'll be that one.

I'm so glad I got this...it's an absolute gem.

It's a monster (a dual monster).

Man this thing looks so nice, great features for a very reasonable price.

The price/performance/features/HP ratio is just fantastic, IMHO.

I use mine in LFO mode so often that I sometimes forget how amazing the VCOs are.

Thank you, Klavis, for your excellent work; especially Twin Waves, which I think is worth its price and size for its LFOs alone.

I'm not really a fan of shared knobs on digital modules but the Twin Waves implements this between its two oscillators in a very fluid and ergonomic manner.
The symbols it uses for each waveform algorithm are also quite well designed; they're all pretty self-explanatory but after a single read through of the manual to be sure of the specifics I was good to go.

I own the Twin Waves and I'm super impressed with the build quality.

Biggest value module you own?

That's the question a Muff Wiggler post asked to the community.
Name your most valuable module whatever the type.
The Twin Waves was put in the spotlight several times.

Klavis Twin Waves for all of the function that it brings in a small space.
Clever thing.

+1 for Klavis Twin Waves.
It can do so much and it's 2 in 1.
Incredible value especially in reduced size racks and for melody use.

For oscillators... probably the Klavis Twin Waves.

Videos

Twin Waves overview by Marcin

Firmware update 1.13 - Algorithm selection by CV

Overall product presentation during Superbooth 2017
Eric from Klavis interviewd by Max from Prognosis

Using a single Twin Waves as a complex oscillator.
In the various examples, the FM is not used.
Instead, synchronization, time reversal and wave shaping are done from osc2 to osc1.
If needed, perfect pitch relation without altering the timbre can be achieved by (internally) deriving the V/Oct for both osc from the osc1 input jack.

The video is quite old, with a now obsolete firmware.
In the meantime, several synthesis algorithms were added or improved.

SH 8 by Vincent Vanesse
3 Twin Waves play all tunes.

Sicurezza by Andrea Ronen
A nice piece with the Twin Waves as the sole sound source.
Allow it a minute to start and wait for the bass line at 2:20 ;-)

Puzzle Girl by Modulogeek
Twin Waves playing the percussive arpeggio from 2:10

Twin Waves Demo by Perfect Circuit Audio
Twin Waves used as dual VCO

Twin Waves Offset by Dave Houtmeyers
Twin Waves does the arpeggiated lead line

15 steps brake and get physical by Gregory Delabelle

TW first patch by Dave Houtmeyers

Tuesday is Tuesday day by ApolaKipso
TW is playing the lead line, with nice tweaks

Firmware update 1.13 features presentation by Marcin

More videos on our Youtube channel !

Audio clips

One Twin waves as triple audio source

Set as dual VCO in OFFSET mode + SUB out, all mixed and sent to a Korgasmatron (filter modulated with a LFO sync of a second Twin waves using browian vectors algo.

  • VCO1: Unison SAW (note = C), Quantizer = minor
  • VCO2: Additive Odd (note = F), Quantizer = minor, harmonic content modulated from a second Twin waves in LFO mode with Brownian vectors algo
Overall FX: Black hole DSP + Z-DSP

Supersaw

  • First section VCO: Supersaw with phase spread driven by second section's LFO
  • Second section as LFO: Sine in Sync mode with mult/div ratio manually tweaked. Sent to VCO param + Korga for filtering.
Modcan Dual LFO introduced in the second part.

Analog rythm

Changing algo on the fly manually.
( CV control of Algos was not available initially! )

Analog rythm jam

  • Beats (Analog Rythm) and bassline (Twin waves + SSF Pole ZERO)
  • Sound effects (Twin waves + SSF MMF)

Sunday Afternoon Techno Jam

Sunday Generative Patch

Twin Waves going through a WMD MMF VCF, is doing the bass line duties on both of these.
It is using the Unison Saw algorithm.

Klavis Demo

First minute is Twin Waves' output A in detuned saw algo.
Output B appears about a minute later in the self-sync sine algo.
Then the sub out comes in for the last minute to beef things up a bit.

Continue reading

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